Golden-haired maiden. Radiant young mother. Seasoned jailbreaker. Feared outcast. Talented healer and sympathetic goodwife—and last but not least, murderous witch. In her years upon this earth, the mysterious Maria Hallett of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, lived a startling number of lives. But...
Henry Debosnys: madman? Genius? Murderer? The truth, incredibly, is still out there. A pictographic language inspired by Egyptian hieroglyphics. A blend of six languages, among them Latin, Portuguese, and Greek. A collection of strange and mournful sketches,...
Can the dead commit a crime? Until the late 19th century, residents of New England thought so, given the trail of corpses that littered local communities from Massachusetts to Vermont. Gaunt, wasted, afflicted by bloody, painful symptoms,...
Called the Camp Creek Crash, this ghastly accident took the lives of nearly forty souls. But who was responsible? Remarkably, according to historian and professor Jeffery Wells, some speculation lies not on the men operating the train but on the train...
The newspapers of 1857 would have you think so! Following his election in 1856—a bitterly contested election just five years before the outbreak of the Civil War—President-Elect James Buchanan was holed up in the nation’s capital, forming...

Is there any act more macabre than dismemberment? To take the knife or axe to the body you’ve just slain; to hold the limbs, still warm to the touch, in your bloodied hands; to raise your arm before lowering it and then—

No, we’re pretty sure there’s nothing worse. Seriously. We checked.

As we’ve seen, criminals will do just about anything to hide evidence of their crimes, including burying the corpse of their lover in their own backyard. But when criminals take things to the next level, desperate times calling for desperate measures and all—if you remember the unfortunate case of Sam McMillan of Sanford, Florida, then you’ll remember the rather grisly discovery that investigators searching for his remains found in October 1882.

Too bad John C. Best of Breakheart Hill Farm, Massachussetts, wasn’t a Crime Capsule reader, because he might have disposed of his own victim’s body more successfully.

We’ll spare you the backstory, riveting though it is—a dark and murky stew of violence, whiskey, licentiousness, adultery, whiskey, repression, abuse, enforced flights by horse-and-carriage, unruly mobs, and oh, did we mention the whiskey? The pages of Douglas L. Heath and Alison C. Simcox’s Murder at Breakheart Hill Farm: The Shocking 1900 Case that Gripped Boston’s North Shore are positively soaked with the stuff. Between that and the homemade apple cider they all drank instead of water, it’s a wonder these late Victorian farmers didn’t die of cirrhosis first before murdering each other.